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    Optic Nerve Decompression Surgery

    Optic Nerve Decompression Surgery

    Optic Nerve 

    The optic nerve extends all the way from the brain into the skull and the eye. It is also called the nerve of vision. The optic nerve has its major portion enclosed within a bony and rigid tunnel in the skull. Compression or swelling at this location may result in blindness or loss of vision.

    Endoscopic optic nerve decompression helps in relieving pressure on the nerve and stabilizing or improving vision. This minimally invasive procedure involves removal of a small portion of the bony optic canal. It is carried out using small rigid telescopes or endoscopes, which allows the surgeon to go through the sinuses and nose for performing this delicate surgery.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic & reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding locations.

    Candidates for Optic Nerve Decompression Surgery

    Optic nerve decompression is used for treating conditions that may cause or threaten progressive vision loss because of significant pressure on the optic nerve along the optic canal. The procedure can be used for treating optic nerve pressure because of:

    • Fibro-osseous lesions or overgrowth of bone that narrows the optic canal
    • Growth or tumors within the eye which exerts direct pressure on the nerve
    • Trauma or head injury

    Results to Expect

    This is a surgical procedure which is performed using general anesthesia. The surgeon will go through the nose to perform an endoscopic sinus surgery. Sinuses open right next to the optic nerve besides the eye. A portion of the optic canal will be removed once this is done.

    This creates more space within the bony canal and decompresses the optic nerve. It also reduces pressure on the nerve. Generally, nose packing is not required after the procedure. However, patients may be kept in the hospital overnight for close observation.

    Understanding Optical Nerve Sheath Fenestration

    Orbital surgeons have preferred approaching the lateral and superior orbit through the anterior superior eyelid crease for removing intraorbital lesions. However, in recent years the anterior superior eyelid crease technique has gained more popularity in neurosurgery. This is because the surgery provides excellent exposure to the anterior skull base.

    Excellent cosmetic outcome is a great advantage of the approach. This is because the incision can be easily hidden within the superior eyelid crease. The medial intraconal space can be accessed easily by making an incision in the superomedial eyelid crease for performing an ONSF (Optical Nerve Sheath Fenestration).

    The medial horn of the levatoraponeurosis is pushed in place laterally after opening the orbital septum. A plane is created with blunt dissection between the superior oblique tendon and the medial rectus muscle for accessing the posterior orbit.

    The optic nerve is then brought into view with further posterior dissection. A rectangular window or a slit is created inside the optic nerve sheath. Decreased traction on the globe, decreased bleeding, decreased operating time, and absence of extraocular muscle dissection is achieved through superiomedial eyelid approach.

    Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for advanced and innovative eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

    Optic Nerve Removal

    Optic Nerve 

    The optic nerve is also called Cranial Nerve II (CN II) or the second Cranial Nerve. It is located at the back of the eye and is responsible for transmitting visual information. The eyes work like the windows to the world with the brain processing the visual information transferred. This is made possible by electric impulses.

    The optic nerve can be damaged easily like other parts of the human body. This can be because of trauma, eye disease, shock, injury, radiation, and toxins. Optic nerve damage is also possible because of diseases of the central nervous system.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic & reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding communities.

    Common Causes for Optic Nerve Damage

    Optic nerve can be damaged due to the diseases of the brain, eye, and the central nervous system. It may happen because of shock, injury, trauma, and overexposure to radiation as well.

    Other diseases, such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy, Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy, Optic Nerve Head Drusen, Optic Neuritis, Multiple Sclerosis, Optic Neuropathy, Glaucoma, and Optic Nerve Hypoplasia may also damage the optic nerve.

    Optic Neuritis is an inflammatory condition that causes swelling in the optic nerve. This condition is usually accompanied by other diseases, such as Multiple Sclerosis. The nerve fibers become affected because the disease causes communication issues between the body and the brain.

    Optic Neuropathy is caused when there is damage to the optic nerve that results in the loss of vision. A common occurrence with this condition is the loss of color.

    Glaucoma refers to a set of eye conditions which result in optic nerve damage. The intraocular pressure builds up in glaucoma that affects the optic nerve. The nerve eventually gets damaged because of the buildup of pressure and may even lead to blindness.

    Optic Nerve Damage Symptoms

    Many people experience tremendous pain because of optic nerve damage. People with this condition may also lose their vision. This is because the optic nerve links the eyes to the brain. Another common occurrence is loss of color vision. People tend to suffer from partial loss of color vision.

    It is possible for loss of visual perception to occur as well. This is true when the damage to the optic nerve is severe.

    Other symptoms of optic nerve damage include:

    • Distorted vision
    • Decline in vision field
    • Eye inflammation
    • Permanent or temporary loss of vision

    Weakness of the limbs and numbness in the extremities are other symptoms. However, these are rare symptoms and may be linked to a neurological disorder.

    Early Detection of Optic Nerve Damage is Vital

    It’s critical that optic nerve damage be detected early. This can help in slowing down the effects of the injury or disease. Your treatment provider may also be able to manage the symptoms or modify the course of damage. Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for advanced and innovative eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

    Graves’ Eye Disease (Thyroid Eye Disease – TED)

    Thyroid Eye Disease (TED)

    Graves’ disease, an autoimmune condition, has a common symptom in the form of eye disease. Graves’ disease usually affects the thyroid, but can also affect the eyes and skin. Thyroid in the human body is a butterfly-shaped gland situated right at the base of the neck.

    Increased secretion of hormones (hyperthyroidism) and abnormal enlargement of the thyroid (goiter) characterize Graves’ disease. Thyroid eye disease eventually develops in many patients suffering from Graves’ disease.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding locations.

    Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Eye Disease

    Signs and symptoms of this disease vary vastly from one person to the next. Eye conditions can be anywhere from mild to severe. For certain individuals, the condition can result in disfigurement of the eye socket, pain, and loss of eyesight.

    Graves’ eye disease can differ in terms of expression as well. The disorder remains unchanged for several people over the years while for others it improves or worsens. Remission or exacerbations of the disease are rare though.

    Thyroid eye disease is defined as a progressive disorder. There is progressive damage in this condition to the tissues surrounding the eyes, which can result in tissue remodeling and scarring (fibrosis).

    Causes of Graves’ Eye Disease

    Graves’ eye disease and its exact underlying process are not yet understood fully. However, people with the condition are known to have a compromised immune system that creates thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (an abnormal antibody).

    Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin is very good at mimicking the functioning of regular thyroid stimulating hormone produced normally in the thyroid. It is believed that these abnormal antibodies negatively impact the cells around the eyes, causing characteristic symptoms commonly associated with thyroid eye disease.

    Treatment of Thyroid Eye Disease

    Corticosteroids may be recommended for people with moderate to severe symptoms. These drugs help in reducing swelling and inflammation. However, they do not affect proptosis and diplopia. Prednisone is the commonly used corticosteroid to help people with thyroid eye disease.

    Surgery may be the only option for few people with moderate to severe symptoms. It is preferred usually to avoid surgery until the disorder’s active phase has ended. Doctors try treating individual symptoms until the swelling and inflammation reduces. Surgery may be carried out if the doctor believes the condition to be progressing into becoming sight threatening.

    Motility, orbital decompression, and lid surgery are few popular surgical options. Your surgeon will remove the bone between the sinuses and the eye socket (orbit) during orbital decompression surgery to allow the eye to fall back naturally into position. The surgery is reserved for patients that are at a high risk of loss of vision because of pressure on the optic nerve.

    Surgical options can also help correct position of the eyelids and bulging eyes (proptosis). Certain muscles around the eyes are repositioned during motility surgery. Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for innovative and advanced eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

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