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Retinoblastoma Eye Cancer

Retinoblastoma Eye Cancer

Retinoblastoma Eye Cancer | Dallas | Plano | Austin, TexasRetinoblastoma refers to an eye cancer that starts in the retina, which is the sensitive lining on the inside of the eye. Retinoblastoma most frequently develops in young children, but can also occur in adults in rare cases. 

The retina comprises nerve tissue that senses light as it comes through the front of the eye. The retina sends signals through the optic nerve to the brain, where these signals are interpreted as images. 

Retinoblastoma is the most commonly occurring type of cancer impacting the eye in children, and it can develop in one or both eyes. Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding communities. 

Symptoms

As retinoblastoma mostly impacts infants and small kids, symptoms are rare. The noticeable signs may include:

  • A white color in the center circle of the eye, or pupil, when light is shone in the eye, such as when taking a flash picture
  • Eyes that seem to be looking in different directions
  • Eye inflammation
  • Eye redness

When to See a Doctor

In case the parent notices any changes to the child’s eyes that concern them, they should make an appointment with their child’s doctor. A retinoblastoma is a rare form of cancer. Therefore, the child’s doctor may explore other more common eye conditions initially. 

In case of a family history of retinoblastoma, the parent or guardian should ask their pediatrician when the child should start routine eye examinations to screen for retinoblastoma.

Treatment

The most suitable treatments for a child’s retinoblastoma depends on the location and size of the tumor, whether cancer has spread to regions other than the eye, the child’s overall medical condition, and the parent’s preferences. The objective of the treatment is to cure the cancer. When possible, the doctor will work to preserve the child’s vision.  

Surgery

Surgery to remove the affected eye (enucleation) involves disconnecting the tissue and muscles around the eye and removing the eyeball. A part of the optic nerve, which runs from the back of the eye into the brain, also is removed. 

Surgery to Place an Eye Implant 

Right after the eyeball is removed, the surgeon inserts a special ball (comprising plastic or other materials) in the eye socket. The muscles that control the movement of the eye are attached to the implant. 

Once the child heals, the eye muscles will adapt to the implanted eyeball. Therefore, it may move just like a natural eye does. But the implanted eyeball cannot see.

Fitting an Artificial Eye 

Several weeks after the procedure, a customized eye can be placed over the eye implant. The artificial eye can be created to match the child’s healthy eye. The artificial eye lies behind the lids and clips onto the eye implant. The child’s eye muscles move the eye implant; it will seem as the child is moving the artificial eye.                             

Oculoplastic & reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for advanced eye care procedures.

For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

Offices in Dallas and Austin, Texas.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Eye Cancer

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Eye Cancer | Dallas | Plano | Austin, TexasNon-Hodgkin lymphoma (also called non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL, or at times, simply lymphoma) is a cancer that begins in white blood cells (lymphocytes), which are a part of the body’s immune system. 

Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding locations.

Types of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

NHL treatment depends on which type it is. Therefore, it is crucial for doctors to understand the exact type of lymphoma that the patient has. The type of lymphoma will depend on the type of lymphocyte that is affected (B cells or T cells), the maturity of the cells when they become malignant, and other factors.

B-Cell vs. T-Cell Lymphomas

The lymph system comprises lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells that help the body combat infections. There are two primary types of lymphocytes:

B lymphocytes (B cells)

The normal function of B cells is to protect the body against bacteria or viruses by making proteins known as antibodies. The antibodies attach to the germs and mark them for destruction by other parts of the immune system. 

T lymphocytes (T cells)

There are various types of T cells. Certain T cells destruct germs or abnormal cells in the body. Other T cells enhance or slow the activity of other immune system cells. 

Lymphoma can initiate in either type of lymphocytes. However, B-cell lymphomas occur most commonly. 

Indolent vs. Aggressive Lymphomas

The forms of NHL can also be classified on the basis of how fast they grow and spread:

Indolent lymphomas grow and spread gradually. Certain indolent lymphomas might not need to be treated immediately. However, they can be closely observed instead. The most commonly occurring type of indolent lymphoma in the US is follicular lymphoma.

Aggressive lymphomas grow and spread rapidly, and typically need to be treated immediately. The most commonly occurring type of aggressive lymphoma in the US is diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

Certain types of lymphoma, such as mantle cell lymphoma, do not fit completely into either of these categories. 

Irrespective of how fast they grow, all non-Hodgkin lymphomas can spread to other areas of the lymph system if not treated. They can eventually also spread to other areas of the body, such as the brain, liver, or bone marrow. 

Common Treatment Approaches

The treatment approaches for NHL will depend on the type of cancer, the stage of cancer, the patient’s health, and other factors. 

Palliative or supportive care is another vital part of treatment for many people. This can help avoid or treat issues such as low blood cell counts, infections, or some symptoms caused by lymphoma. 

Can Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Found Early?

In people who do not show symptoms, screening tests, or exams are used. Careful, routine medical check-ups are crucial for individuals with known risk factors for NHL (such as organ transplants, HIV infections, autoimmune disease, or prior cancer treatment). 

These people do not usually get lymphoma. However, they should still be aware of potential symptoms and signs of lymphoma. Oculoplastic & reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for advanced eye care procedures.

For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

Offices in Dallas and Austin, Texas.

Melanoma Eye Cancer

Melanoma Eye Cancer | Dallas | Plano | Austin, TexasMelanoma is a form of cancer that begins in the cells that create melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin its color. 

The eyes also have cells that produce melanin and can develop melanoma. Ocular melanoma is another name for eye melanoma. A majority of eye melanomas develop in a part of the eye that is not visible when viewing a mirror. This makes eye melanoma challenging to diagnose. 

Patients should note that eye melanoma usually does not present any early signs or symptoms. Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan, provides safe and proven eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding communities. 

Symptoms

Eye melanoma may not lead to signs and symptoms. However, when they do occur, the signs and symptoms of this condition may include the following:

  • A sensation of specks of dust or flashed in the vision (floaters)
  • A growing dark spot on the iris
  • A change in the shape of the pupil (dark circle at the center of the eye) 
  • Blurry or poor vision in one eye
  • Peripheral vision loss

When to Consult a Doctor

If a person experiences any signs or symptoms that worry them, they should promptly consult a doctor. Sudden vision changes indicate an emergency, and the patient should seek immediate medical care in such circumstances. 

Treatment

The treatment options for eye melanoma will depend on the size and location of the melanoma as well as the patient’s general health and preferences. 

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy makes use of high-powered energy, such as gamma rays or protons, to eliminate cancer cells. Radiation therapy is often used for small to medium-sized eye melanomas.

Laser treatment

In certain situations, a laser to eliminate the melanoma cells may be a viable option. One type of laser treatment, known as thermotherapy, uses an infrared laser and is sometimes used along with radiation therapy.

Photodynamic therapy

Photodynamic therapy is a combination of drugs with a special beam of light. The medication makes the malignant cells vulnerable to light. The treatment causes damage to the vessels and the cells that comprise the eye melanoma. Photodynamic therapy is used in the treatment of smaller tumors, as it is not effective in the case of larger cancers. 

Cold treatments

In some small eye melanomas, extreme cold (cryotherapy) may be used to destruct melanoma cells. However, this treatment is not commonly used. 

Surgery

In surgical procedures used to treat eye melanoma, a part of the eye or the entire eye may be removed. The procedure that the patient will undergo will depend on the location and size of the eye melanoma. 

Surgical options may include the following:

  • Surgery to excise the melanoma and a tiny area of normal tissue
  • Surgery to remove the melanoma and a margin of healthy tissue surrounding it may be a treatment option for small melanomas
  • Surgery to remove the complete eye (enucleation)

Enucleation is typically used for the treatment of large eye tumors. In addition, it may be used if the tumor causes eye pain. 

After the removal of the eye melanoma, the surgeon will insert an implant into the same position. The muscles controlling the eye movement are attached to the implant, which enables the implant to move.

After the patient has had some time to recover, a prosthesis (an artificial eye) is made. The front surface of the new eye will be custom painted to match the color of the patient’s existing eye. 

Oculoplastic & reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for advanced eye care procedures.

For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

Offices in Dallas and Austin, Texas.

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