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    Dallas
    Khan Eyelid & Facial Aesthetics
    3242 Preston Rd, Suite 120
    Plano, TX 75093

    Austin
    Tru Skin Dermatology
    3500 Jefferson Street
    Suite 200
    Austin, TX 78731

    Eye Cancer Stages

    Eye Cancer Stages

    Eye Cancer

    Doctors try to determine the extent of cancer spread after someone has been diagnosed with eye melanoma. This process is referred to as staging. Stage of cancer helps in describing the extent of its spread within the body. Identifying the present stage of eye melanoma by an ophthalmologist or an eye doctor helps in determining an appropriate treatment plan.

    Advanced stages of cancer may require a surgery or enucleation for removing the tumor. You may need reconstructive surgery afterwards by an experienced surgeon. During your consultation process, your eye surgeon will discuss all your treatment options.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides advanced eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding locations.

    AJCC TNM Staging System

    The TNM (tumor, node, and metastasis) model is prescribed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and is a commonly used staging system for eye melanoma. It is based on three key principles:

    • T (size and extent of the tumor) – Has the eye tumor invaded nearby structures?
    • N (spread to lymph nodes) – Has it spread to ear and neck lymph nodes? Has it grown into other parts of the eye?
    • M (metastasis to distant body parts) – Has it spread to the liver or other body parts?

    Certain letters and numbers may appear after T, N, and M to offer more information about these factors. Higher letters and numbers represent advanced cancer stages.

    T Factor for Iris Melanoma

    • T0: Zero evidence of primary tumor
    • T1: Tumor restricted to the iris
      • T1a: Tumor touches less than ¼ portion or ¼ of the iris
      • T1b: Tumor touches more than ¼ portion of the iris
      • T1c: Tumor is placing pressure on the eye (glaucoma) but is restricted to the iris
    • T2: Tumor has spread to choroid or ciliary body
      • T2a: Tumor spread to ciliary body
      • T2b: Tumor spread to both choroid and ciliary body
      • T2c: Tumor spread to choroid and/or ciliary body and causing glaucoma
    • T3: Tumor spread to choroid and/or ciliary body as well as sclera
    • T4: Tumor extends outside the eyeball
      • T4a: Tumor outside the eyeball measures 5mm or less
      • T4b: Tumor outside the eyeball measures greater than 5mm

    N Factor for Iris, Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma

    • NX: Lymph nodes can’t be assessed
    • N0: Tumor has not grown into lymph nodes
    • N1: Small cancer deposits spread to parts of the eye or nearby lymph nodes
      • N1a: Cancer spread to lymph nodes
      • N1b: Tumor not spread to lymph nodes, but there are small cancer deposits in the eye

    M Factor for Iris, Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma

    • M0: Tumor not spread to other distant body parts
    • M1: Eye melanoma has spread to distant body parts
      • M1a: Largest tumor area is 3 cm or less
      • M1b: Largest tumor area is from 3.1 to 8 cm across
      • M1c: Largest tumor area is more than 8 cm across

    Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for safe and proven eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

    Tests For Eye Cancer

    Eye Cancer

    The first step to detecting eye melanoma is to choose an experienced ophthalmologist (eye doctor) who can perform an accurate diagnosis for your eye condition. Early detection of eye melanoma is important. Advanced cancer may require surgical intervention and lead to loss of vision or a part of the eye. You may choose an experienced surgeon for this reconstructive surgery.

    The doctor will check your eye movement and vision. They will also look for dark spots and other symptoms of eye melanoma. Enlarged blood vessels inside or outside the eye is a symptom of tumor. The doctor may order one or more tests to diagnose melanoma of the eye.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides advanced eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding locations.

    Imaging Tests

    Imaging tests involve x-rays, sound waves, radioactive particles, or magnetic fields to create a picture of internal body parts. These tests are conducted for:

    • Finding any suspicious cancerous area
    • Determining extent of cancer
    • Judging treatment results
    • Determining recurrence of cancer

    Ultrasound

    This is another common test used for diagnosing eye melanoma. Tumors appear prominently in ultrasounds. Doctors can use ultrasound to confirm melanoma diagnosis in most cases. Ultrasounds are also helpful in showing the size and location of the tumor.

    Abdominal ultrasound may be performed if eye melanoma has already been detected. This is to look for signs of spread in other parts of the body, especially the liver.

    Fluorescein Angiography

    Orange fluorescent dye (fluorescein) is used for performing this test. The fluorescein is injected into a vein in the arm. Special light is used to take images of the back of the eye.

    This light makes the dye glow and allows the doctors to look at blood vessels within the eye. Melanomas may not appear prominently in this test. However, various other eye problems can, and your doctor can tell if the problem is cancerous or not.

    Computed Tomography (CT) Scan

    Detailed cross-sectional images of the internal body parts can be seen through a CT scan, which effectively combines several x-rays. CT scan can help detect if the cancer has spread to parts outside the eye. It may be used to detect the spread of cancer to other body parts as well, such as the liver.

    Biopsy

    Usually, a biopsy is performed to detect the presence of cancer. A small sliver of the tumor is removed and examined in a lab to detect the presence of cancer cells. Generally, biopsies are not performed for the purpose of detecting eye melanoma.

    This is because imaging tests and routine eye exam can accurately detect almost all cases of eye cancer. However, a biopsy can be useful for checking gene mutations and predicting prognosis. It can be performed for early detection in worrisome areas. It can also help in the selection of targeted drugs that will work best on the cancer.

    Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for safe and reliable eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

    Signs And Symptoms of Eye Cancer

    Eye Cancer

    Board Certified Ophthalmologist in Plano, Texas | DallasEye melanoma is a rare form of cancer and hence doesn’t have any widely accepted screening tests. Screening tests help in detecting diseases, like cancer in people that have no outwardly symptom. There are a few types of eye cancers that your ophthalmologist or eye doctor may be able to detect early.

    Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics, led by oculoplastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan, provides advanced eye care procedures to patients in Austin, Dallas, Texas, and surrounding communities.

    How is Eye Melanoma Detected?

    Yearly eye exams are recommended by many doctors for those at risk of contracting eye melanoma. This includes people with BAP1 cancer syndrome or dysplastic nevus syndrome. Routine eye exam can usually detect the presence of melanoma of the eye. The doctor may notice a dark spot while looking through the pupil into the eye. This dark spot can be early melanoma.

    Most doctors believe that eye melanoma begins as a benign mole or nevus. This nevus can be described as a non-cancerous tumor comprising of pigment cells. You should get routine checks from your ophthalmologist if such a benign tumor has been found in the eye. The same holds true for people finding a dark spot on their iris or the colored part of the eye.

    Eye Cancer Symptoms

    Most people with melanoma of the eye don’t show symptoms unless the tumor starts spreading or the cancer becomes more advanced. Few signs and symptoms you should watch out for include:

    • Sudden loss of vision
    • Blurry vision
    • Squiggles or spots drifting in the line of vision called floaters
    • Light flashes
    • Visual field loss
    • Change in the shape or size of the pupil
    • Growing dark spot on the iris
    • Bulging of the eye
    • Change in eyeball position or the way it moves within the socket

    There are several causes of developing dark spots in the eye. For instance, with age, floaters become quite common in the eye. However, it is recommended that you visit a doctor right away if you notice any dark spots or other symptoms. This way your cancer can be treated early, and your eye and vision can be saved.

    If you allow your eye melanoma to spread, it may involve removal of certain parts of the eye. This will require a reconstructive surgery from an experienced oculoplastic and reconstructive surgeon. Pain in the case of eye melanoma is rare unless the tumor spreads to the outside portion of the eye.

    Preventing Eye Melanoma

    There is a direct link between melanomas of the skin and sunlight. There are certain steps you can take to reduce the risk of eye melanoma. For starters, you can limit exposure to intense sunlight. The American Cancer Society recommends wearing UV-protected wrap-around sunglasses.

    Sunglasses with 99% to 100% UVA and UVB absorption offer the best protection against eye melanoma. These glasses can also help reduce the risk of developing skin cancer around the eyes. Board certified ophthalmologist Dr. Tanya Khan receives patients from Austin, Dallas, Texas, and nearby areas for safe and proven eye care treatments.

    Contact Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics and Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan Today to Schedule an Appointment

    For more information about procedures and treatments at Khan Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics by Ophthalmic surgeon Dr. Tanya Khan. Click here to contact us.

    Offices in Dallas, Plano and Austin, Texas.

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